“Perhaps one reason Navidson became so enamored with photography was the way it gave permanence to moments that were often so fleeting.”

Why do we shoot film?

It's actually mentioned in our tagline - film is retro and timeless. Much like vinyl records, film photography is currently experiencing a renaissance in the realm of art and appreciation. With photography and editing technology in a state of constant advancement, we find it can be a very comforting and nostalgic experience to return to an antiquated medium.


It's a much more tactile, kinesthetic experience than shooting digital photography - from loading the camera to developing the film, it's all created in your own hands. Post-production editing is not often utilized, as we find the film results are quite unique and lovely without any extra help. It also calls for more patience and attention to detail - the amount of photos you can take are limited. Each shot must be precise, as they are all precious (and pricey!).

35mm


  • The classic form of film, most commonly used
  • HUGE variety available today
  • Found in disposable/re-usable cameras
  • Smaller size = lower resolution, higher grain
  • 24-36 photos per roll of film
  • About $12 per roll, ~$15 to develop and scan

Fujifilm Velvia, "slide" film

120/medium format


  • The more professional form of film
  • Larger size = higher resolution, less grain
  • Can be comparable to digital at times
  • 9-12 photos per roll of film, depending on camera used
  • About $15 per roll, ~$18 to develop and scan

Kodak Portra 400 - set by Birdseed Florals

Double Exposures

This is one of our favorite film manipulations! It is done entirely in-camera, by simply keeping the film in place instead of advancing it - this allows the photographer to take two images that are overlaid on top of one another, on one single frame. We have been working on mastering this technique for several years, with multiple types of cameras and films.


The trick is in the light and shadows - where there is darkness in the first image, the second/overlapped image will appear. You want both shots to have some light areas and some dark areas to create contrast and allow both images to show through. L&E utilizes two techniques currently; 1) shooting both images at the same exposure so they are both equally pronounced, and 2) shooting one image slightly overexposed, and the other slightly underexposed - this allows for one image to be more prominent than the other.

35mm Kodak Gold 200

120 HP Ilford 400

35mm Kodak Portra 400

Polaroids


The magic that you get to take home with you, the day of your shoot (after scanning). Instant film can be particularly tricky, but the reward is so much sweeter. Our preferred Polaroid camera is the sx70 land camera - it's the only Polaroid with manual focus, manual exposure adjustment, and a true-to-reality viewfinder.


Lighting is absolutely key to beautiful polaroids! Natural light is best when possible, but instant need A LOT of it. We only utilize flash when necessary, as it can be quite harsh & white-washing. This polaroid was taken on a Polaroid Now with i-Type film, without flash or exposure adjustment in a very sunny space.

Polaroids


The magic that you get to take home with you, the day of your shoot (after scanning). Instant film can be particularly tricky, but the reward is so much sweeter. Our preferred Polaroid camera is the sx70 land camera - it's the only Polaroid with manual focus, manual exposure adjustment, and a true-to-reality viewfinder.


Lighting is absolutely key to beautiful polaroids! Natural light is best when possible, but instant need A LOT of it. We only utilize flash when necessary, as it can be quite harsh & white-washing. This polaroid was taken on a Polaroid Now with i-Type film, without flash or exposure adjustment in a very sunny space.

Polaroid Pack Film, or "peel-apart"; the oldest & rarest Polaroid film we use

Polaroid Round Frame shot on a Polaroid sx70

Let's Create!


Have more questions about film, cameras, or development? Feel free to reach out to Sarah for tips and tricks! Discussing film and sharing knowledge is one of our favorite activities. We've found the film photography community on instagram is particularly gracious and supportive, and we want to continue emulating that energy.

Interested in a private film photography lesson? Fill out the form below to get started. Prices and perks are based on what you can afford; what we use is based on your interests. Film and cameras are provided (unless you'd like to bring your own!)